Hepialidae

0017 (ABH3.002) Common Swift Korscheltellus lupulina (=Hepialus lupulinus), (Linnaeus, 1758)

KR00067

 Photo © Peter Bissell
Common Swift
 Photo © Peter Bissell
 pre-1981
 1981-1999
 2000-2009
 2010-onwards
 Photo © Peter Bissell
Earith
Earith
 Photo © David Griffiths
 Photo © Jonathan Newman
Earith
Earith
 Photo © David Griffiths
Hemingford Grey
Hemingford Grey
 Photo © Nick Greatorex-Davies
Hemingford Grey
Hemingford Grey
 Photo © Nick Greatorex-Davies
Earith
Earith
 Photo © David Griffiths
Earith
Earith
 Photo © David Griffiths
Pupa remains in soil, Great Staughton
Pupa remains in soil, Great Staughton
 Photo © Peter Bissell
A bad attack of swifts from one Hellebore, Great Staughton
A bad attack of swifts from one Hellebore, Great Staughton
 Photo © Peter Bissell


General Information

This is the most common of the UK swift moths.

 

The female is larger and the male has quite variable markings.

 

Flies mainly at dusk and within the first hour of darkness.

 

Pupates underground.

Overwinters as Overwinters as a larva.
Both sexes readily come to light, sometimes in numbers.

Forewing length: M 11-16mm. F 15-20mm.
Foodplant(s): grasses, herbaceous plants
Flying: One generation, May-July
UK Presence: Resident
National status: Common

Habitat

Grassland, gardens, roadsides, fens and moorland.

Regional Information

Recorded in 133 (49.3%) of the 270 2km squares of Huntingdonshire.

Last recorded in August 2019

Recorded date range (Adult): 17 April to 30 August

Similar Species
Great Staughton
Great Staughton
 Photo © Peter Bissell
Orange Swift Triodia sylvina (=Hepialus)
 Photo © Barry Dickerson
Gold Swift Phymatopus hecta (=Hepialus)


Larva/Leafmine:
Larva Type:
Glossy
Colours:
grey, white, brown
No. of Proleg Pairs:
5